MIRIAM TEUMA

Lecturer at the Youth and Community Studies Department

MIRIAM TEUMA

Lecturer at the Youth and Community Studies Department
University of Malta

Biography

Miriam Teuma has been a lecturer at the Youth and Community Studies Department at the University of Malta for the past 15 years. She is one of the founding members of the Maltese Association of Youth Workers and a president for 10 years. She also has extensive experience at European Union, Council of Europe and international level on youth related issues and is a member of the Council of Europe’s Steering Committee for Youth (CDEJ), the Youth Working Party of the European Union and a vice-president of ERYICA (European Youth Information and Counselling Agency). She has also worked with the European Knowledge Centre for Youth Policy, SALTO Euromed and the EuroMed Youth Platform and has led the Maltese EU Presidency for the Youth Field in 2017. Miriam has contributed papers on youth work policy and practice to a number of international studies.

In December 2010, Miriam Teuma was appointed as the first Chief Executive of Agenzija Zghazagh, Malta’s Youth Agency. As Chief Executive she is aresponsible for implementing and coordinating the national youth policy Towards 2020A shared vision for the future of young people .

ABSTRACT

A new revolution, or fourth industrial revolution, is unfolding, characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres. Rapid change and innovation is transforming entire systems of production, management and governance that can result in greater inequality and labour market disruption. New employment opportunities through innovative entrepreneurship and new business platforms providing new services are emerging. Over 30% of the world’s population now uses social media that can promote learning, information sharing, cross-cultural understanding and geopolitical cohesion, but that can also create unrealistic expectations, economic, political and cultural resentment and spread extreme ideologies, radicalisation and terrorism. The ground between government and citizens is getting narrower through the redistribution and decentralisation of power and challenges to traditional authority and existing political systems and structures and citizens growing demands for transparency, efficiency and accountability.

Does this revolution also involve a revolution in the way we live, learn and work? What knowledge, life skills and competencies do we need for the future? What is the future dynamic between private life, working life and citizenship?

All session by MIRIAM TEUMA